Thursday, 3 August 2017

Skokholm

Skokholm Island





A group of five from the ringing group went to Skokholm Island bird observatory for four days.
We set off on the Sunday to stay at a lovely B&B near to Martin Haven. There was a possibility that we would get an early crossing to the island on Monday morning, however en route to Wales I received a call from the warden Richard stating the crossing would be delayed until 1630hrs because of the weather.
Monday came and we managed to get across to the island where we were greeted by Richard, Giselle, Katy, Holly and Jacob.

After a briefing from Richard we were shown the nets, Heligoland traps and other equipment. That evening we were planning to catch Storm Petrels at the South Haven so we helped to erect a couple of nets near to the landing area.






It was an excellent evening catching and processing over 260 Storm Petrels and for some a new experience of extracting birds from nets in the dark. We were in bed by about 3.30 am and then up again at 0600 opening the other nets near to the buildings and ringing the smaller birds on the island.

Ringing Hut


Cottage Heligoland

Tuesday evening we were due to catch more Storm Petrels but due to the high wind we had to cancel. So we had an early night.

Wednesday was a bit of a wash out with very little ringing carried out until the evening
when we caught Manxies. We spent some of the dry time trying to find Puffin chicks in their burrows. But were unfortunately unsuccessful.


From about 23.30 -02.30 we were out catching Manx Shearwater, either by hand or in a small hand net. These are fantastic birds that breed on the island in their 10's of thousand, and then after raising their chick, fly south towards South America.



 We manged to process 47 birds.

Thursday was again a windy day with very little mist netting carried out. However we did manged to catch a few juvenile Lesser Black Backed Gull by hand, which was a new species for some of the group and more Manxies in the evening.



 Friday was another wet day with next to no ringing carried out. However Kate did manage to catch one of the elusive Wheatear that had been teasing us by not taking the bait in the spring traps. Although the day was wet we did mange to see other occupants of the island. The wind, swell and tide prevented us from getting off the island  today.






Saturday was a beautiful day although again too windy to open all the mist nets.
Peter had brought his whoosh net over onto the island and had had a couple of unsuccessful attempts at catching gulls(they were too weary of the net). But this morning he manged to catch a 2nd year Jackdaw. By lunchtime we were packed and transferring our luggage to the jetty.
Putting the bad weather conditions aside (which definitely restricted our mist netting and Storm Petrel catch) we all had a fantastic time on the island and were very sad to leave. 

Our thanks to Richard and Giselle for their assistance and hospitality.  (Pub quizzes will never be the same).

 In total we processed 550 birds of which 260 were Storm Petrels and 140 were Manx Shearwaters.


Dawn, Kate, Stuart, Peter and myself.

Friday, 2 June 2017

Mud, Glorious Mud

Stanford reservoir is usually kept pretty full of water. This means there is little mud to attract waders and almost no chance of them breeding. This year however, there is work being done at the dam end, which means the levels have been lowered dramatically over the spring and this will continue well into the autumn.
Stanford Res low water by P Norrie

This has kept our resident birders in a continual state of frenzy, chalking up Black Winged Stilts, Greenshank, Dunlin, Ringed Plover, Grey Plover, Turnstone, Ruff, Godwits and Spotted Redshank, amongst others. Both Lapwing and Little Ringed Plover have bred successfully thus far. On Tuesday 30 May, Mick, Adam and Peter N met up to explore the possibility of ringing some of the chicks. After observing the LRP on the Leics side, Mick noticed that the mother had both chicks with her. This was a great opportunity and he successfully retrieved both. We quickly slipped rings on and released them!
LRP chicks by P Norrie

We then had a look for the four Lapwing chicks but the parent was keeping them well off shore, beyond our reach. Elsewhere we have started the Constant Effort Site sessions again. The warblers have returned but despite having a record breeding season last year, our Grasshopper warblers seem to have forsaken us, possibly due to adverse winds during the migration period. The Cetti’s on the Northants side seem to be absent too but they do seem to have survived on the Leics side, so with luck they will breed and spread back. The site can still surprise us however, and last week on CES duties we ringed an otherwise unheard of spring Spotted Flycatcher! Bring on the rarities!

Peter N

Monday, 23 January 2017

Scrub Bashing!

Yes, it’s that time of year again. The SRG hordes are out every Saturday morning armed only with with loppers, saws, Thermos flasks and sundry other tools to to cut back the scrub which has grown up over the year at Stanford reservoir. We’ll be doing this, weather permitting until April. This promotes a dense undergrowth in spring at the reservoir. To explain why we do this throughout the cold and damp months, here is a quote from a letter kindly sent to us by one of our regular birdwatchers:

There was a late spring evening last year when I stood quietly at the back of Blower’s Lodge Bay. From this one spot, I could hear Grasshopper Warbler, Cetti’s Warbler, Lesser Whitethroat and Garden Warbler, plus the usual ‘commoner’ species.
This diversity is a testament to the hard work the group puts into managing the habitat’.

What a kind thought! This is absolutely true, the warblers (and indeed many other birds) love the dense undergrowth generated following scrub bashing, where they feel secure to nest and bring up their young; so we feel our effort is very well spent. Please note that readers are very welcome to join us in this endeavour- contact details can be found on the SRG main web site (a link can be found on this page on the right).
Following a morning’s bashing, we had our annual shin-dig on the 21st January at our spiritual home, the White Hart in South Kilworth, with SRG members and various partners. Here is the commemorative picture of the event- those of a sensitive nature may wish to turn away now…

Stanford RG annual gathering - 21st Jan 2017
Back - Peter N, Ed, Andy, Clare, Simon, Judy, Peter B, Peter R, Adam, Lynn
Front - Kate, David, Jo, Dawn, Denise, Mick

Regards
PETER

Tuesday, 27 December 2016

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

To all our readers and followers we wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.




✹✹✹✹✹✹MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A 
HAPPY NEW YEAR✹✹✹✹✹✹

Tuesday, 13 December 2016

Autumn update

Peter N writes: No doubt Mick will give us an end of year summary soon, but it has been noted that the blog has been looking a little sparse, so here is an update. It has been a fabulous year at Stanford with some fabulous birds. In September we ringed our first ever Wryneck (see earlier posts), and last month we ringed the first ever Common Snipe (ringed by Kate, our new trainee). So that is two absolute stonkers.

Common Snipe by P Norrie
Adam had been running a sweepstake for the next new species to be ringed, and Snipe was on the list, so that ended it, congratulations to Lesley. This raised £135 for the group, well done Mr H for organising it.
I won’t steal Mick’s thunder by doing a preview of the years statistics, except to mention our Redwing totals. Redwings are migratory thrushes, about the same size as a Song thrush, but with a nice red under-wing and flank, plus a pale eye stripe. They come to us to over-winter from Scandinavia and points north when the weather gets colder. We never chase totals (cough, cough) but this year we have been able to ring throughout December, because the weather has been dominated by high pressure. By contrast last year December was largely a washout as front after front came in from the Atlantic. We have been out three times a week before dawn with the Latvian love song playing on the Mp3 players and the nets set high! This has paid off and we have now ringed over 900+ To celebrate this, here is a commemorative picture of ‘Mr 900taken on a cold grey morning.

2016's 900th Redwing by P Norrie
Will we get to crack the 1000? We start scrub bashing in January in preparation for the return of the breeding birds and December is moving on; if the weather holds we might be able to get another five sessions in, so it is possible but far from certain… for all of this and much, much more, keep watching this blog!

Wednesday, 12 October 2016

Iceland Ringing Trip

Peter N visited Iceland between 19 and 29 September. Here is a brief report of his birding and ringing activities:

Iceland is very very beautiful and very very expensive! Autumn is actually quite a quiet time bird-wise to visit. The dominant species are Redwing (Icelandic- dark and large) and Meadow pipit, both preparing to migrate. My contact at the South East Iceland Ringing Observatory was Brynj├║lfur Brynj├│lfsson, known to everyone as Binni. He very kindly drove me from Reykjavik to Hofn where the observatory is based, stopping at some birding hot spots on the way down. The town can also be accessed by plane (Eagle Air) and bus. The Observatory has been established for more than 10 years and is the result of a lot of hard work by Binni and his friend Bjussi. Each year they ring c.30-35 species. It is based about half a mile outside of Hofn, and is thus easily accessed:
Bird Observatory - by P Norrie
I had three mornings of ringing. The weather was… well let’s say challenging, but we got some nets open each day. My ringing list reflected the general birding, as follows: Redwing, Meadow pipit, Wren (Icelandic subspecies- big!) Blackcap and Snipe (new ringing species for me). On day two the boys kindly let me ring two Merlin, first year birds, male and female:
Merlin 1stW male - by P Norrie

Merlin 1stW female - by P Norrie
Fantastic! The obs usually gets a handful of Merlin every year, but this was the first time they had had two on the same day; it must be the SRG vibe working its magic. In the afternoons Binni invariably took me birding, and we chalked up stonking views of Gyrfalcon and Harlequin duck. He is a birding legend in Iceland and, while we were out, spotted Iceland’s first confirmed Black Scoter. Many thanks to Binni for his kindness and hospitality, and we hope he will visit us in the near future. If you are passing his way he is always keen to hear from birders (and ringers in particular), and can be contacted on binni@bbprentum.com. I plan to return in Spring 18, to see Iceland in the breeding season. PETER

Monday, 26 September 2016

Cyprus 2016

This is in Memory of Alan Crabtree who sadly died recently.
Alan had been the ringer in charge on Cyprus for many years.

Now I know that this entry is slightly out of date as Mick, Denise and myself went to Cyprus in April and May. But it has taken this long for our techni-phobe Group Leader Mick to get me the photographs.
Anyway, Mick and Denise went to Cyprus for approx 6 weeks and met up with Mel Preston and his wife Janet in Polis.  I joined them mid way into their holiday for only a week but what a week I had. I managed to ring everyday. I was there either with Mel and Mick, Bill Jones or a group of ringers from Sorby Breck,  Paul, Steve, Mark, and Geoff.

The star of the trip was a Lesser Grey Shrike which I believe was only the second ringed on the island.

Below are just a few of the birds caught by us during this period.




Lesser Grey Shrike


Bonnelli's Warbler


Zitting Cisticola


Whinchat



Bee- Eater


Night Heron




Wood Sandpiper


Little Egret


Squacco Heron



Different variations of Yellow Wagtails






Collared Flycatchers

 Wood Warbler



Barred Warbler


Red Backed Shrike

Golden Oriole

When we were not ringing we either relaxed by the pool or watched other wildlife on the island.


Denise posing


Nice pinny Mel


Hummingbird Hawk Moth


Mouflon


Spur- Winged Lapwing


A great time was had by all, and thanks guys for your help and patience.

Looking forward to next years trip.