Wednesday, 12 October 2016

Iceland Ringing Trip

Peter N visited Iceland between 19 and 29 September. Here is a brief report of his birding and ringing activities:

Iceland is very very beautiful and very very expensive! Autumn is actually quite a quiet time bird-wise to visit. The dominant species are Redwing (Icelandic- dark and large) and Meadow pipit, both preparing to migrate. My contact at the South East Iceland Ringing Observatory was Brynj├║lfur Brynj├│lfsson, known to everyone as Binni. He very kindly drove me from Reykjavik to Hofn where the observatory is based, stopping at some birding hot spots on the way down. The town can also be accessed by plane (Eagle Air) and bus. The Observatory has been established for more than 10 years and is the result of a lot of hard work by Binni and his friend Bjussi. Each year they ring c.30-35 species. It is based about half a mile outside of Hofn, and is thus easily accessed:
Bird Observatory - by P Norrie
I had three mornings of ringing. The weather was… well let’s say challenging, but we got some nets open each day. My ringing list reflected the general birding, as follows: Redwing, Meadow pipit, Wren (Icelandic subspecies- big!) Blackcap and Snipe (new ringing species for me). On day two the boys kindly let me ring two Merlin, first year birds, male and female:
Merlin 1stW male - by P Norrie

Merlin 1stW female - by P Norrie
Fantastic! The obs usually gets a handful of Merlin every year, but this was the first time they had had two on the same day; it must be the SRG vibe working its magic. In the afternoons Binni invariably took me birding, and we chalked up stonking views of Gyrfalcon and Harlequin duck. He is a birding legend in Iceland and, while we were out, spotted Iceland’s first confirmed Black Scoter. Many thanks to Binni for his kindness and hospitality, and we hope he will visit us in the near future. If you are passing his way he is always keen to hear from birders (and ringers in particular), and can be contacted on binni@bbprentum.com. I plan to return in Spring 18, to see Iceland in the breeding season. PETER

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